A RETURN TO THE LIZARD

A return to Mullion Cove for my birthday. A great four days sketching and taking photographs for future compositions. My wife and I visited Kynance Cove and the light at this time of year was quite stunning. Cadgewith Cove was also visited and my wife searched for sea glass whilst I sketched a few of the boats. This was continued with Seafood Chowder at the Cadgewith Inn.
Other sites to see were Coverack Harbour where sea glass was found, when the rain did finally make an appearance we continued on to the Lizard Point where the sun made an appearance again. Overall we were very lucky with the weather as you can see from some of my photographs. Al

BEDRUTHAN STEPS

Bedruthan Steps, mixed media on 40 x 30″ deep edge canvas. I was struck by the white parallel lines of the incoming waves on this day as I sat on top of the cliffs. The name Bedruthan Steps is said to be taken from a mythological giant called Bedruthan, who used the tall rock formations on the beach as stepping stones, and seems to be a late-19th-century invention for Victorian tourists. It is now part owned by the National Trust, the beach is now closed due to cliff instability and fear of visitors becoming cut off by rapid incoming tides.

MULLION COVE

An hour of getting rid of the blank white canvas and laying out the basic tones and colours for this painting. It’s been quite a while, for various reasons, since I daubed paint on canvas so this initial start should commit me to action.
We loved our stay here a few weeks ago and the coastline along this particular part of the Cornish coast is stunning. I sat sketching the sea from ontop a cliff here and watched a sailing ship weight anchor and it’s small boat venture into Mullion Harbour over the crystal clear turquoise water.
The final acrylic painting is 24 x 30″ on canvas please note that the colours are not as the original painting! Al

LIZARD BREAK.

Kynance Cove.

Sadly my mother Ruth recently died so after a lot of organising of funeral arrangements we decided to keep a previously booked short break to Mullion in Cornwall and take a breath. Luckily for us the weather was wonderful and there were very few tourists around; this was apparently because of our weekend fell between Whitsun and Half Term Holidays, a sort of vacational sweet spot.
Mullion is a beautiful little harbour with stunning views up and down the Cornish coastline a perfect place with which to explore from. During our weekend we visited Kynance Cove with it’s spectacular rock formations, Cadgwith Cove with it’s idyllic thatched roofs and cottages, Gunwalloe Beach with it’s beautiful church in the dunes and the town of Porthleven with it’s interesting harbour and market stalls.

We stayed at the brilliant Mullion Cove Coastal Retreat in a lodge with a jacuzzi! What a great time we had late in the evenings drinking wine and relaxing in the warm bubbly water. I’m sure some of these images will eventually inspire me into creating more paintings. For my wife and I the highlights of the weekend were Cadgwith Cove, where we had a marvellous meal at the Mullion Cove Inn, and of course the stunning Kynance Cove. Al

Cadgwith Cove.

A Night in Bodmin Jail.

My wife and I spent a wonderful time in Bodmin Jail.  This jail has been fully renovated to accommodate a four star hotel.  We spent the night in the Naval Wing in room 125.

Within the Jail’s walls is the only working Victorian Gallows in the UK and has claimed the lives of 55 prisoners.  Each of the Hotel’s rooms has a plaque of an inmate who spent time there, ours was John Hoskins who stole of bushel of wheat and walked into the fresh air for the last time on the 11th August 1796.  The prison closed in 1927.
Here is a video on my YouTube channel  https://youtu.be/bz3Gx402co0 

A visit to Padstow & Rock for inspiration.

I took an early morning walk along the quay in Padstow and it was wonderful to see the boats coming in during a quiet sunrise. Below is St Enodoc Church just a fifteen minutes walk out of Roc, the spire is actually that bent. On the way there we fed a tame robin by hand, the poet laureate Sir John Betjeman is buried here too. To get to Rock you have to take the ferry from the quay at Padstow which takes you across the River Camel giving you views out to the Doombar and down the Estuary.

We stayed two nights at The Old Custom House in the harbour and from our window had marvellous views out over Padstow and across to Rock; who needs a television or iPhones when you have such a view. It was wonderful to see Padstow without the throngs of tourists and after four at night was almost a ghost town. We ate at Rick Stein’s Seafood Restaurant and Paul Hainsworth’s Caffe Rojano and The Mariners at Rock, we had superb meals with friendly staff at all.