Over Buck’s Mills.

This acrylic painting is well under way. I’ve started by using an ultramarine acrylic spray graffiti can to create an almost uniform blue base colour. I’ve then gradually dry brushed layer after layer to create some 3D depth to the sky. I’m now using some watered down paint to blow in the sea, waves and foreground, then using my favourite Payne’s Grey I’ve accented some depth to the pebbles. I must say I like the vapor trail of the plane on it’s way out to sea. During the pandemic the amount of flights have dropped and this has been evident in our North Devon skies. To be continued …

Blackchurch.

New acrylic on 24 x 30″ canvas entitled BLACKCHURCH. This is of the famous Blackchurch Rock on Mouthmill Beach on the North Devon Coast. Below are the stepped progress photographs. A little annoying trying to capture the colours of this painting with my camera, but for once I’m very pleased with this composition.

This little Cove was recently portrayed in a film called The Guernsey Literary and Peel Pie Society which showed off much of our idyllic coastline. This cove is rather isolated and takes about thirty minutes to walk to from the hamlet of Brownsham on the Hartland Peninsula, it is here where the National Trust has a carpark. There is a lovely circular walk from the carpark and if you continue along the coast you finally reach the fishing village of Clovelly where you return back overland to the carpark. Below are a few of my photographs from the area showing the cottage used in the film.

Broadsands to Great Hangman.

This painting is of Broadsands Beach in North Devon as you would see it, out across the water from Watermouth Cove, 900 x 600mm acrylic on canvas.  There is a marvellous view out over Broadsands from the top of the hill on the right of this painting which is called, as previously posted and mentioned, The Happiest View In Britain.
   Below is a view of my present workspace with an old discarded, yet rather useful anaesthetic drug rack which is used as a base for painting, thanks to my colleagues at work. There you will also see the progression to the competed composition.
This will be the very last detailed acrylic of this kind as I’m moving forward with experimentation, and a fresher more immediate approach.  I quite like the initial tonal shades of this painting and the temptation for me is just to leave it as it is, but I decided to ruin the freshness with some detailed brush work.  Al 

Watersmeet Tearooms.

A warmish Bank Holiday Sunday so we drove to the carpark just above the Watersmeet Tearooms which are managed by the National Trust. Not too many people here because of Covid so we sat in the sun and each imbibed in a rather nice cream tea. The birds here are quite tame and at times you can hand feed the sparrows and chaffinches. After tea we walked down from the Tearooms to Lynmouth along the Lyn Valley. Finally we arrived at our destination and found a warm spot by the river out of the cold wind to relax in. I must say though that Lynmouth was heaving with tourists. Al
ps The first two pictures of the Tearooms were taken a few years ago when Covid hadn’t been invented yet and leaves were on the trees!

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/watersmeet/features/eating-and-shopping-at-watersmeet

Bucks Mills.

To get off my usual way of working today I’ve decided to be a little more spontaneous and place a time limit on my work. This is the result an acrylic on gesso panel of Bucks Mills in North Devon at almost low tide. What a great morning spent there in the Spring sunshine watching the surfers off The Gore. I remember at the Bideford School of Art one of my teachers called Jimmy or James Patterson painted a wonderful watercolour of Bucks Mills now at the Burton Gallery in Bideford. Must go back and do some plein air! Below is a pen and ink of mine of Bucks with a nod to Jimmy. Al

To The Blue Ball Inn.

final

Back to using my Bideford Black pigment on Bockingford paper 700 x 340mm.  This time is a picture inspired from a circular walk from Watersmeet to the Blue Ball Inn at the top of Countisbury Hill.  Then onto Lynmouth and back up to where we started our walk.
The Blue Ball Inn was so called because in the late 18th century it was used as a coaching stop.  A blue ball used to be raised on a pole to notify the coachmen that someone was in need of passage.  It has a history of haunting and highwaymen!

The Artist’s House at Bucks Mills.

19059918_1503295199721208_2174098914467924995_nI would love to spend a few days here painting and drawing the North Devon coast at Bucks Mills.  I used to surf here on Christmas Day and have many happy memories of summer days here.  This is a pen and ink drawing it did a few years ago with a nod towards an old art teacher of mine at Bideford Art College/North Devon College called Jimmy Paterson ARCA.  He painted this very scene and I’ve seen it displayed at the Burton Gallery in Bideford.  Al

Heddon’s Mouth.

IMG_1392 copy (2)
From a plein air acrylic sketch made during the summer, seen below, I’ve added some additional digital layers to plan the progress of this painting.  Heddon’s Mouth is a wonderful pebble beach on the coast of North Devon.  The National Trust have the wonderful Hunter’s Inn here which is both pub, hotel & restaurant.  The circular walk from this place down to Heddon’s Mouth and back is one of my favourite walks.  More progress pictures to follow as this composition unfolds. Al

http://www.thehuntersinnexmoor.co.uk/exmoor-restaurant/
http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/heddon-valley/trails/gentle-walk-to-heddons-mouth

Midday At Bucks Mills.

18813637_1494718907245504_9195562976165650723_nBack to a little Pen & ink just to change the tempo for awhile.  Midday at Bucks Mills a picturesque village on the North Devon coast in England.  This leads down to a stoney beach where in bygone time there used to be a small harbour and limekilns.  With a little licence i’ve added a few cow parsley plants to liven things up.  The cabin in the middle of the picture is owned by the National Trust and used to be an artist’s retreat.  Still used today although not as a residence.

I dedicate this picture to the memory of an old art teacher of mine, ‘James Paterson A.R.C.A. 1916 – 1986.  Know to us as Jimmy’  who painted some wonderful watercolours of this village and the surrounding area

.